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Posted by on Jun 30, 2015 in Brain Injury | 0 comments

Traumatic Brain Injuries: Common Causes and Symptoms

A traumatic brain injury is a very serious medical condition caused by an external force that is applied to the head, leading to some significant damage to the brain. This external force can be created by a blow to the head, a fall, a car accident, or any other incident that will cause the head to hit a solid surface or cause a foreign object to penetrate the head through the skull.

Depending on the severity of the blow and the amount of force applied to the head, the damage caused by a traumatic brain injury can be temporary or permanent. With a temporary injury, the individual will experience dysfunction in certain areas of the brain and the bodily functions it controls or regulates and will slowly regain function after some time in recovery. With permanent damage, an individual can end up suffering from long-term complications such as paralysis and even brain death.

Following an accident, an individual might not be aware that he or she might be suffering from such a serious injury. Initially, traumatic brain injuries typically don’t show any concerning signs and noticeable symptoms. That’s why patients that have been in accidents that have caused them to hit their heads might walk away from the scene feeling fine, only to fall to more serious symptoms such as convulsions, seizures, and loss of consciousness after a few hours have passed. As such, it’s important to look out for early warning signs such as confusion, disorientation, dilated pupils, headaches, fatigue, drowsiness, and loss of balance and coordination.

Traumatic brain injuries that result from car accidents, slips and falls, and workplace explosions are often seen as the result of negligent or reckless behavior by another party. In these instances, it’s important for victims and their families to seek out legal counsel to receive the information they need about pursuing just compensation.

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